Brave Vestas workers are sacked – but the fight goes on

For over a week now Vestas workers on the Isle of Wight have occupied their employer’s offices in an effort to stop the factory closing and their jobs being shipped overseas.

A workforce that wasn’t unionised, that had no experience of such a campaign, have shown how workers in England can struggle and gain support nationally (from many trade unions and environmental activist groups) and internationally (South Korean workers in the same situation have sent solidarity greetings).

These workers have now been sacked.

We need to show the government and Vestas how much this annoys us.

Our brothers and sisters in Scotland had 20,000 people marching in Kilmarnock last Sunday to protest job losses at profitable Diageo’s Johnnie Walker plants.

We can do the same for the Vestas workers!

Socialist Worker reports:

The workers have released a statement, which was read out at the protest outside the plant this evening. They said, “We all received letters to tell us that we had been sacked with no redundancy money. This has not deterred us in any way. We are now fighting for everyone else. Come to the court tomorrow. Bring your friends and family, and spread the word.”

Steve, one of the occupation’s stewards, read management’s letter to the rally. It stated that the workers had been sacked for “gross misconduct” as a result of their industrial action.

Steve said, “We will fight this all the way. We will not rest until the workers get what is rightfully theirs. They have fought for all of us. We will show the world that they are heroes.

“We have one message for the Vestas management: ‘We are here to stay.’ Please come to the court tomorrow. We will be putting on a show of strength there to show that workers in the Isle of Wight will not roll over.”

Darling begs the banksters, yet again

Bad news for Alistair Darling.

No, not that his cat’s just died, which is sad enough.

But that the banks don’t listen to his pleas to lend.

For months now he’s begged them to do something to help the small and medium enterprises, which are the back-bone of the private sector, get affordable credit.

But no, despite having nationalised much of the banking sector, the banksters aren’t listening. They’re profiteering.

To cap it all, John Kingman, the head of UKFI, the arms-length company which administers UK citizens’ collective stake in the banks, has announced that he’s stepping down to get a bigger pay-packet in the private sector.

If Darling is serious about wanting to help people through the recession – to keep businesses going and keep workers in their jobs so we can get out of it – then he should put representatives on the boards of the nationalised banks and make sure they give small businesses a fair deal.

We need democratic public ownership – with workers’ representatives on the boards of the banks.

In another months’ time there will be thousands of people out of work because the banks are being greedy – and they won’t be begging New Labour to change course…