Ukania’s economic crisis

Ukania – the centralised British state – could come under increased pressure in coming years as the UK economy unravels. Alex Salmond, leader of the Scottish government has been complaining about the Bank of England’s handling of the credit crisis.

The WSWS’s Chris Marsden has an informative piece on recent reports issued by the International Monetary Fund and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Here’s the bit about Ukania:

Britain has long been recognised as the European country most exposed to the economic turmoil unleashed in the United States and most heavily dependent on world financial markets. The IMF downwardly revised UK growth figures from the Treasury’s estimate of 2 percent this year and 2.5 percent next to 1.6 percent for both 2008 and 2009, the worst performance since the last recession ended in 1992.

After nationalising Northern Rock and injecting £50 billion of liquidity into the markets, the Brown government and the Bank of England plan to risk billions more, emulating the US Federal Reserve by taking over bad mortgage debts from banks in return for secure government bonds.

House prices in Britain already fell by 2.5 percent last month and are expected to decline by as much as 10 percent this year. Britain’s Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors reports that the number of residential property agents saying prices declined exceeded those reporting gains by 78.5 percentage points in March, the worst since records began in 1978.

Britain is also labouring under staggering levels of personal, unsecured debt.

Total UK unsecured debt is £1.3 trillion—more than the rest of the European Union put together. Lorna Bourke, writing in Citywire, rejects claims that the present housing crisis is not as bad as that in the 1990s, when there were 78,000 repossessions a year, because unemployment is lower. She notes that “In the early nineties high unemployment created by the collapse of the debt market in 1987 and rising inflation meant homebuyers could not meet their mortgage obligations. Does that sound familiar?”

Credit card debt is much greater than it was in 1990. Financial analysts Mintel have reported that mortgage costs in Britain trebled during the past 10 years and now account for 25 percent of consumer spending, compared to 14 percent a decade earlier. The debt management company TDX Group estimates that the number of people struggling with debt is set to double during 2008. Around one million people have unsecured debts totalling £25 billion, averaging a staggering £25,000 each. Some 60 percent is owed on credit cards, with the rest mainly in personal loans.

London’s role as a financial centre will translate into a massive and relatively immediate impact from a global economic downturn. JPMorgan Chase analysts estimate that 40,000 City of London jobs could be lost as a result of the credit crunch, doubling the forecast by the Centre for Economics and Business Research.

Amongst the cuts already announced are 900 jobs at UBS, the European bank worst hit by the credit crunch, representing 10 percent of its London workforce. Merrill Lynch has warned of 450 imminent job losses in London.

Initial signs have emerged of a rise in unemployment from its present 1.6 million. Although the claimant count rate fell by 1,200 in March, the previous month’s 2,800 decline was revised to show a 600 increase—the first since September 2006.

Sterling has hit repeated all-time lows against the euro, which is presently worth more than 80 pence. The Bank of England has cut interest rates to 5 percent in an attempt to stimulate the release of credit by banks and building societies.

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2 Responses to “Ukania’s economic crisis”

  1. TRM Says:

    Forgive me for being a little confused. The name of your blog and the article leave me wondering what your point is… My conclusion is that The US and UK, if they are suffering from similar economic fever’s, then the “virus” is liberal social policy’s and restrictive regulation and taxation on the free market… am I off base from your mode of thought?

  2. charliemarks Says:

    Yes, you are.

    The economic woes are being suffered by working people, not because of “liberal social policies” or “restrictive regulation and taxation on the free market” but because capitalism is an inherently disordered and undemocratic economic system in which boom is followed by bust. The UK government had wrongly claimed the business cycle was no more – now that reality has proved them wrong it will be the centralised British state that comes under pressure as well as the administration of Gordon Brown. Pro-independence forces are powerful in the governments of both Scotland and Wales, they will use the economic crisis to demonstrate the necessity of independence.


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